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The samaritan woman at the well bible study

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Just before He ascended to heaven, Jesus told his disciples, Go and make disciples of all nations. We know that this is a command for all Christians in each successive generation. Yet I think most of us feel guilty because we hardly ever tell anyone about the greatest gift in the world salvation through Jesus Christ. But usually our problem is to know how do to do it. One of the ways is through Friendship Evangelism. The premise is that as we try to win people to Jesus Christ, we must attempt first to become their friends, talk to them, listen to them, invite them to our homes, go places with them, show them love, help them in their need.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Woman at the Well

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Story of The Samaritan Woman at the Well Explained

Lesson 3: The Samaritan Woman (John 4)

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The story of the woman at the well is one of the most well known in the Bible; many Christians can easily tell a summary of it.

On its surface, the story chronicles ethnic prejudice and a woman shunned by her community. But take look deeper, and you'll realize it reveals a great deal about Jesus' character. Above all, the story, which unfolds in John , suggests that Jesus is a loving and accepting God, and we should follow his example.

The story begins as Jesus and his disciples travel from Jerusalem in the south to Galilee in the north. To make their journey shorter, they take the quickest route, through Samaria. Tired and thirsty, Jesus sat by Jacob's well while his disciples went to the village of Sychar, roughly a half-mile away, to buy food. It was about noon, the hottest part of the day, and a Samaritan woman came to the well at this inconvenient time to draw water.

During his encounter with the woman at the well, Jesus broke three Jewish customs. Firstly, he spoke to her despite the fact that she was a woman. Second, she was a Samaritan woman, and the Jews traditionally despised Samaritans. And, third, he asked her to get him a drink of water, although using her cup or jar would have made him ceremonially unclean. Jesus' behavior shocked the woman at the well. But as if that weren't enough, he told the woman he could give her " living water " so that she would never thirst again.

Jesus used the words living water to refer to eternal life, the gift that would satisfy her soul's desire only available through him. At first, the Samaritan woman did not fully understand Jesus' meaning. Although they had never met before, Jesus revealed that he knew she'd had five husbands and was now living with a man who was not her husband. He had her full attention! As Jesus and the woman discussed their views on worship, the woman voiced her belief that the Messiah was coming.

Jesus answered, "I who speak to you am he. As the woman began to grasp the reality of her encounter with Jesus, the disciples returned. They too were shocked to find him speaking to a woman. Leaving behind her water jar, the woman returned to town, inviting the people to "Come, see a man who told me all that I ever did. Meanwhile, Jesus told his disciples the harvest of souls was ready, sown by the prophets, writers of the Old Testament and John the Baptist.

Excited by what the woman told them, the Samaritans came from Sychar and begged Jesus to stay with them. Jesus stayed two days, teaching the Samaritan people about the Kingdom of God. When he left, the people told the woman, " To fully grasp the story of the woman at the well, it's important to understand who the Samaritans were--a mixed race people, who had intermarried with the Assyrians centuries before.

They were hated by the Jews because of this cultural mixing and because they had their own version of the Bible and their own temple on Mount Gerizim. The Samaritan woman Jesus met faced prejudice from her own community. She came to draw water at the hottest part of the day, instead of the usual morning or evening times, because she was shunned and rejected by the other women of the area for her immorality.

Jesus knew her history but still accepted her and ministered to her. By reaching out to the Samaritans, Jesus showed that his mission was to all people, not just the Jews. In the book of Acts , after Jesus' ascension into heaven, his apostles carried on his work in Samaria and to the Gentile world.

Ironically, while the High Priest and Sanhedrin rejected Jesus as the Messiah, the outcast Samaritans recognized him and accepted him for who he truly was, the Lord and savior. Our human tendency is to judge others because of stereotypes, customs, or prejudices. Jesus treats people as individuals, accepting them with love and compassion.

Do you dismiss certain people as lost causes, or do you see them as valuable in their own right, worthy of knowing about the gospel? Share Flipboard Email. Jack Zavada. Christianity Expert. Jack Zavada is a writer who covers the Bible, theology, and other Christianity topics. Updated March 02, Learn Religions uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience. By using Learn Religions, you accept our.

Hidden Questions: Lessons From the Woman at the Well

Jesus Christ was the master teacher of all times. He taught in such a variety of ways. While he frequently spoke to the multitudes, he also spent considerable time in one-on-one situations. He gave kindly attention to the individual. They were meticulously orchestrated so as to enhance the greatest advantage for the success of his coming kingdom.

The story of the woman at the well is one of the most well known in the Bible; many Christians can easily tell a summary of it. On its surface, the story chronicles ethnic prejudice and a woman shunned by her community. But take look deeper, and you'll realize it reveals a great deal about Jesus' character.

The journey since morning had been long, and now the sun of noontide beat upon Him. His thirst was increased by the thought of the cool, refreshing water so near, yet inaccessible to Him; for He had no rope nor water jar, and the well was deep. The lot of humanity was His, and He waited for someone to come to draw. As she turned to go away, Jesus asked her for a drink. Such a favor no Oriental would withhold.

Finding Hope in the Story of the Samaritan Woman

W hy was the woman at the well a turning point for women, not only in Christianity but also in the world? The story can be read in John chapter 4 and finds Jesus speaking to a woman. Men of the first century rarely spoke to women at all. In fact, women at the time and in that culture were considered property and were not given any social status. They could not vote, they could not go into the inner sanctuary, they had no voice in the home, and they were divorced at the drop of a hat. The very fact that the women got the water for the family, including the men, shows that they were treated like slaves. They were regarded as a servant more than a member of the family.

Samaritan woman at the well

The story of the woman at the well John has as much direct discussion of human labor as any story in John; but one has to draw deeply to taste it all. This motif permeates the Gospel: the crowds repeatedly show an inability to transcend everyday concerns and address the spiritual aspects of life. They do not see how Jesus can offer them his body as bread John They think they know where he is from Nazareth, John , but they fail to see where he is really from heaven ; and they are equally ignorant as to where he is going John

He meets a Samaritan woman. She is alone — why?

Throughout the gospels in the New Testament, there are many stories about encounters between Jesus and seemingly random people. I often study these scriptures and sometimes, commentaries in an attempt to extract meaning from these brief exchanges. One of the encounters is between Jesus and a Samaritan woman, who is often referred to as the woman at the well. The disciples seem to have disappeared for a while and so Jesus goes to the well by himself to get a drink of water.

The Samaritan Woman argued with Jesus

Start free trial. It was about noon. How can you ask me for a drink? Where can you get this living water?

Beginning the Journey for new Christians. Wilson's Books Donations Sitemap 8. Ralph F. Michael Dudash, "Living Water. Permission requested.

The Woman at the Well: How Transformation Happens

The Samaritan woman at the well is a figure from the Gospel of John , in John — The woman appears in John 4 :4—42, However below is John — But he had to go through Samaria. So he came to a Samaritan city called Sychar , near the plot of ground that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob's well was there, and Jesus, tired out by his journey, was sitting by the well. It was about noon. A Samaritan woman came to draw water, and Jesus said to her, "Give me a drink. The Samaritan woman said to him, "How is it that you, a Jew, ask a drink of me, a woman of Samaria?

Jesus and the Samaritan Woman at the Well (John 4) Many Christians are familiar with the woman's inability to move from the everyday work of drawing water to Jesus' Learn how they brought dignity to workers with lessons for today.

I met Tamara at the Dallas Juvenile Center and found her willing to talk as we sat at the table. But how could I proceed with this young woman who had a fundamental misunderstanding of salvation? The same way Jesus did. Jesus met a woman as she approached a well in Samaria, and He opened a conversation by asking her for a drink.

Bible Study Guides – The Samaritan Woman (I)

Their temple was on nearby Mount Gerizim, and at one time, was pictured on their coins. It was about the sixth hour. Jesus deliberately went through Samaria, and in doing so crossed strict cultural boundaries of people with differing gender and moral values. However, as we will see, it was necessary, because He had a divine appointment with the woman at Jacob's Well.

BibleGateway

Question: "What can we learn from the woman at the well? This was an extraordinary woman. She was a Samaritan , a race of people that the Jews utterly despised as having no claim on their God, and she was an outcast and looked down upon by her own people. However, this woman was ostracized and marked as immoral, an unmarried woman living openly with the sixth in a series of men.

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Samaritan Woman at the Well Bible Story and Lessons

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Comments: 1
  1. Maum

    On mine, it not the best variant

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